Bible Verses with Lessons about Trees

  • 1 Chronicles 16:33 CSB
    Then the trees of the forest will shout for joy before the Lord,
    for he is coming to judge the earth.
  • Job 14:7-9 CSB
    There is hope for a tree:
    If it is cut down, it will sprout again,
    and its shoots will not die.
    If its roots grow old in the ground
    and its stump starts to die in the soil,
    the scent of water makes it thrive
    and produce twigs like a sapling.
  • Psalm 1:1-3 CSB
    How happy is the one who does not
    walk in the advice of the wicked
    or stand in the pathway with sinners
    or sit in the company of mockers!
    Instead, his delight is in the Lord’s instruction,
    and he meditates on it day and night.
    He is like a tree planted beside flowing streams[a]
    that bears its fruit in its season
    and whose leaf does not wither.
    Whatever he does prospers.
  • Psalm 52:8 CSB
    But I am like a flourishing olive tree
    in the house of God;
    I trust in God’s faithful love forever and ever.
  • Psalm 92:12 CSB
    The righteous thrive like a palm tree
    and grow like a cedar tree in Lebanon.
  • Proverbs 11:30 CSB
    The fruit of the righteous is a tree of life,
    and a wise person captivates people.
  • Proverbs 13:12 CSB
    Hope delayed makes the heart sick,
    but desire fulfilled is a tree of life.
  • Isaiah 55:12-13 CSB
    You will indeed go out with joy
    and be peacefully guided;
    the mountains and the hills will break into singing before you,
    and all the trees of the field will clap their hands.
    13 Instead of the thornbush, a cypress will come up,
    and instead of the brier, a myrtle will come up;
    this will stand as a monument for the Lord,
    an everlasting sign that will not be destroyed.
  • Isaiah 61:3 CSB
    to provide for those who mourn in Zion;
    to give them a crown of beauty instead of ashes,
    festive oil instead of mourning,
    and splendid clothes instead of despair.
    And they will be called righteous trees,
    planted by the Lord
    to glorify him.
  • Jeremiah 17:8 CSB
    He will be like a tree planted by water:
    it sends its roots out toward a stream,
    it doesn’t fear when heat comes,
    and its foliage remains green.
    It will not worry in a year of drought
    or cease producing fruit.
  • Ezekiel 17:22-24 CSB
    “‘This is what the Lord God says:

    I will take a sprig
    from the lofty top of the cedar and plant it.
    I will pluck a tender sprig
    from its topmost shoots,
    and I will plant it
    on a high towering mountain.
    23 I will plant it on Israel’s high mountain
    so that it may bear branches, produce fruit,
    and become a majestic cedar.
    Birds of every kind will nest under it,
    taking shelter in the shade of its branches.
    24 Then all the trees of the field will know
    that I am the Lord.
    I bring down the tall tree,
    and make the low tree tall.
    I cause the green tree to wither
    and make the withered tree thrive.
    I, the Lord, have spoken
    and I will do it.’”

  • Matthew 3:10 CSB (John the Baptist speaking of Pharisees and Saduccees)
    The ax is already at the root of the trees. Therefore, every tree that doesn’t produce good fruit will be cut down and thrown into the fire.
  • Matthew 7:17 CSB
    In the same way, every good tree produces good fruit, but a bad tree produces bad fruit.
  • Luke 6:43-46 CSB
    “A good tree doesn’t produce bad fruit; on the other hand, a bad tree doesn’t produce good fruit. 44 For each tree is known by its own fruit. Figs aren’t gathered from thornbushes, or grapes picked from a bramble bush. 45 A good person produces good out of the good stored up in his heart. An evil person produces evil out of the evil stored up in his heart, for his mouth speaks from the overflow of the heart.
  • Romans 11:24 CSB
    For if you were cut off from your native wild olive tree and against nature were grafted into a cultivated olive tree, how much more will these—the natural branches—be grafted into their own olive tree?
  • Revelation 22:14 CSB
    “Blessed are those who wash their robes, so that they may have the right to the tree of life and may enter the city by the gates.

I’ll take a snow day if I don’t have to make it up

What I really want, what would make me really and truly thrilled with winter each year is snow days without makeup school days.

I’m not trying to be greedy or demanding, truly I’m not.

We love our snow days and all the joy of the unplanned day off, the surprise family day complete with play time and hot cocoa, homemade cookies and Crock Pot soup and canceled evening activities so  we can all stay home and warm and relaxed in the evening.

But then, we wait for the phone call, the one that tells us, “oh by the way, now you have to come to school on President’s Day.”

Or, “we’re now shortening your spring break and lengthening your school year.”

It’s the payback we dread, the consequence for the rest and the fun.  It’s the bad news that we expect hanging over our heads the whole time our kids are jumping around the kitchen for joy.

My sixth grader says her science teacher actually delivers an annual speech that goes something like this: “Oh sure, you THINK you love snow days and you all want to do your snow dances and hope they close school because of a few flakes, but do you want to be in school all summer?  There’s  a price to pay!  You have to make those days up, you know!”

He’s right,  of course.  There is a price.  There is the bad news mixed in with the good that taints it a bit.

So, it’s outrageously impractical of me to ever hope we just get those snow days free and clear.  I know there’s not going to  be a superintendent’s message on my phone that says something like, “Have fun, everybody.  Be safe.  Enjoy the day.  This one’s on us!”

But that’s what I long for, and even though it can’t happen in the practical, day-in-day-out details of all these ordinary days, maybe it’s something I can have spiritually .

I want mercy, not just the trickle of it or the drip-drip-drip of it, but the outpouring of mercy.

I want the abundant grace, the kind that drenches you so much you can wring out your shirt and more comes  pouring out on your feet.

I want the overwhelming flood of God’s goodness poured out, rivers of His goodness just dumped all over us.

But instead, I  start expecting less from God, asking for less, praying for less, settling for less.

Faith isn’t really faith because I’m not believing Him to be wonderful or to be able or to be mighty.  I’m believing Him to fit into practical, average boxes and do ordinary, reasonable things.

When God gives me the blessing of a “snow day,” sometimes I wait for the bad news mixed in there somewhere.  I treat Him like He’s stingy or demanding or skimpy.

But God is abundant.

He is abundant in power, in mercy, in goodness, in peace, in love, and faithfulness.  That’s what Scripture says.  (Click here to read Bible Verses on the Abundance  of God)

He fills us up and satisfies our souls and leaves leftovers.

That’s what Jesus did when He fed the crowd of over  5000 who lingered on a hillside to listen to His teaching.  He took such a meager gift: a few loaves and fish, just a little boy’s packed lunch—and then he fed the multitude. They didn’t have to hand out crumbs at the end either.

No, they had leftovers.

And when they had eaten their fill, he told his disciples, “Gather up the leftover fragments, that nothing may be lost” (John 6:12 ESV).

Not just that one time.  Jesus did it all again.  He fed the 5000 one day and then on another day when he was teaching another crowd, he performed miraculous multiplication yet again, feeding over 4000 people with another handful of bread and fish.

And this is what happened there, too:

They ate and were filled. Then they collected seven large baskets of leftover pieces (Mark 8:8).

Jesus didn’t just do the miracle that was necessary or practical; He fed those people and left baskets of abundance and then he did it all again.

So, why do I discount God’s bigness? Why do I worry over my need as if I have to be the one to fill it and I have to be the one to figure it out?

Why do I fret when God gives good things, superstitiously thinking that bad is coming next?

His abundance offers us rest.  His abundance means we can trust Him and we can let Him do the work and we can worship and rejoice because our God is full-to-overflowing with the very mercy, grace, love, and goodness that we need.

Oh, how abundant is your goodness, (Psalm 31:19 ESV)

Great is our Lord, and abundant in power (Psalm 147:5 ESV).